Facebook wants your nudes to combat revenge porn

Adjust Comment Print

Facebook's new tools to tackle revenge porn come after many scandals where people have had their naked photos uploaded by someone who did not have their permission.

Users are encouraged to send intimate photos to Facebook, who will put a unique digital fingerprint on it before it is sent to the recipient.

The identifier is used to block any further distribution on Facebook, Instagram and Messenger as a pre-emptive strike against revenge porn, a common method of abuse and exploitation online.

Australia is one of four countries participating in a limited global pilot with Facebook that will help prevent intimate images of Australians being posted and shared across Facebook, Messenger, Facebook Groups and Instagram. From there, Facebook will use image-matching technology to detect whether or not an uploaded photo has been previously flagged. The tricky part? You have to know the picture you don't want spread around, and upload it to a special Facebook program.

More news: Don't Fall For This Netflix Email Scam Targeting Millions Worldwide
More news: Colts' Andrew Luck out for season after being placed on IR
More news: Carter Page met with Russian official during 2016 trip to Moscow

Julie Inman Grant, Australia's e-Safety commissioner, said the company will not store the images permanently as after they are processed into a hash, the code is all that will remain. This has a necessary risk built in, but "it's a risk we are trying to balance against the serious, real-world harm that occurs every day when people (mostly women) can't stop NCII from being posted", Facebook security chief Alex Stamos explained on Twitter.

"We're using image-matching technology to prevent non-consensual intimate images from being shared."
There was also no immediate word on when the program will be launched in the U.S. The organization might then tell them to send a nude photo of themselves to themselves via Messenger.

Because the pilot test was reported first by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, with no input from Facebook itself, many users found the notion of uploading their own nude photos directly to the social network a bit unsettling.

It will then be up to the sender to delete the image.

Comments