Even Moderate Alcohol Intake Increases Your Risk Of Cancer, Study Says

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For women, just one alcoholic drink a day can increase breast cancer risk, according to a report released in May from the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund that was cited by ASCO.

"I think the take-home message from the statement is that the really high-risk people are very high drinkers - over a prolonged period of time", LoConte said.

The new review of past studies on the link between alcohol and cancer, published Tuesday in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, found that approximately 3.5 percent of all cancer deaths in the us can be attributed to alcohol consumption. Breast and colon cancers are among the biggest cancer-related killers in the country, claiming almost 95,000 American lives each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). "The Cancer Prevention Committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) believes that a proactive stance by the Society to minimize excessive exposure to alcohol has important implications for cancer prevention".

The authors write that the number of adults who binge drink has been increasing during the past decade.

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"We made a decision to push this out because.we were looking over our portfolio of various statements on primary prevention of cancer and we realized that we did not have a statement on alcohol", Noelle LoConte, a representative of ASCO, told International Business Times Tuesday. The kind of drink does not appear to matter, but experts say a beer or glass of wine here and there is highly unlikely to cause harm.

Heavier drinking is linked with greater risks, the statement said. There's been a lot of talk touting certain alcohols, such as red wine, as cancer-fighting elixirs and superfoods - but these medical professionals reveal a bleak, risky reality of drinking. "We also can't ignore the fact that in many USA counties a quarter of the people, or more, are binge drinkers".

Ashton said alcohol consumption has been shown to be a causative factor in a wide range of cancers, including cancer of the head and neck, esophagus, breast and colon. "It is really the heavy drinkers over a long period of time that we need to worry about", she said. He added, however, that the link between alcohol and cancer has been established firmly, giving the medical community much-needed guidance on how people can reduce risks for the disease.

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